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Weather forecast for today was actually quite horrible. Lucky for me, I was either ahead of the storm, or it went ahead. Either way, missed me when we were moving the pedalboard into the SUV in Long Island, when we were moving things into the SUV from Ikea, and when we were moving things into my house. I was really afraid that it was going to start pouring as we were moving the pedalboard into the house, but it was only a drizzle, and hopefully the contacts are ok.

Set up the nice big polka-dotty rug from ikea, and put the pedalboard and bench on it.

Some more pics of the board:
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IMG_8429.JPGDad lent a helping hand moving the pedals up the flight of stairs. I almost died it was so heavy hahaha! Took all three of us to get it up into my room!!

Let’s get a few close ups and a brief overview of how this baby’s gonna work:
(Btw. I was lucky enough to get a board that already has contacts installed, that saves a LOT of trouble and work. Some pedalboards that come from other old organs don’t, and others have glass encased reed switches and magnets which are slightly different and more difficult to work with, or so I heard. :p)

A close up of the contacts located on the bottom of the pedalboard:
IMG_8458.JPG The 3 spikey things for each note are normally not touching the metal underneath it. When a pedal note is depressed, they connect and complete a circuit, which theoretically should go through the wire as shown here:
IMG_8462.JPGIMG_8461.JPGit’s basically just an on/off switch haha. Quite simple, in theory.

Once the circuit is completed it goes through this little gizmo that’s mounted at the top/front of the board:
IMG_8463.JPGPedal hinges: IMG_8464.JPG

Another shot of the top of the pedals:
IMG_8465.JPGYes, I am in love with my new pedalboard. 🙂

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